You has 0 products in cart

No products

Tax 0,00 €
Total 0,00 €

Prices are tax included

View cart Checkout

Product successfully added to your shopping cart

Quantity
Total

There are 0 items in your cart. There is 1 item in your cart.

Total products (tax incl.)
Total shipping (tax incl.) Free shipping!
Tax 0,00 €
Total (tax incl.)
Continue shopping Proceed to checkout

Gers lightly cooked duck foie gras

Gers whole duck foie gras (300g)

New product

47,35 €

Description

Foie gras is made using a time-honoured method that goes back over 4,500 years.

Large-scale production began in France in the 18th century, when corn was introduced to the Gers region.

Our Gers foie gras is produced using traditional rearing and corn-feeding methods, on our own farm.

More details

Did you know?

The Egyptians, Greeks and Romans used to fatten geese and ducks.

In Latin, the fattened liver was known as "Iecur Fictatum" (fig-stuffed liver). The first recorded appearance of foie gras in Roman times was during the first century BC, in Horace's account of a famous banquet. The Roman infatuation with fig-fattened liver was such that the word "fictatum" (fig-stuffed) was used to describe the livers of all fattened animals from the fourth century onwards. It is also the root of the modern French word for liver, "foie".

In the 19th century, with the development of food sterilisation and storage technologies, canning companies began to emerge. These would later become household names, distributing foie gras across the globe and cementing its reputation as one of the leading lights of French cuisine. Since then, Foie Gras has become a protected part of France's cultural and culinary heritage.

France – the home of the dish of kings:

It was during the Roman era that foie gras was first eaten in the "Provinces". It was particularly popular in various regions of Gaul, especially the south west. Various parts of the Roman Empire – particularly the Gallo-Romans – became experts in preparing this dish. Throughout the Middle Ages, they developed a range of different dishes using fattened animals and, in particular, fattened livers. Many regional languages developed their own words for force feeding. In the 15th century, Christopher Columbus discovered corn in the New World and introduced it to Europe. It was particularly good for fattening geese and ducks and was grown widely in the region.

In the 17th and 18th centuries, fattened birds were one of the staples of the peasant diet. Long before the advent of the freezer, cooking and storing liver and meat in fat was an important food preservation technique. Bizarrely, foie gras was also extremely popular with kings and noblemen in France from the 15th to 18th centuries.

Ingredients: Duck foie gras, salt, pepper.

Serving suggestions:

Foie gras is an ideal starter dish for birthday and anniversary celebrations, special events, or for a great meal at any time. Allow a 50g portion per person. Place the jar in the fridge 12 hours before serving. Carefully remove the contents from the jar and cut off the fat with the end of a knife. Use a hot knife to cut into thin slices. For the best taste, aroma and texture, place the slices on a plate and leave to stand for 15 minutes before serving to achieve the perfect temperature.


Pacherenc, Tariquet or Uby wines are the perfect accompaniment to our Gers whole foie gras.

QuantityDiscountYou Save
3 10% Up to 14,21 €

No customer comments for the moment.

Write a review

Gers whole duck foie gras (300g)

Gers whole duck foie gras (300g)

Foie gras is made using a time-honoured method that goes back over 4,500 years.

Large-scale production began in France in the 18th century, when corn was introduced to the Gers region.

Our Gers foie gras is produced using traditional rearing and corn-feeding methods, on our own farm.

Related Products

En poursuivant votre navigation sur le site, vous acceptez l'utilisation de cookies à des fins de mesure d'audience. En savoir plus

Please wait...